Developing the first Open Peer Review Module for Institutional Repositories

Why aren’t articles on arXiv —or any other open access repository— formally credited as publications? What is it exactly that separates open access repositories from publishers? The simple answer is that publications in journals come with an amorphous quality indicator associated with the journal’s perceived prestige. Articles posted on a repository on the other hand, are considered to be “provided at the reader’s own risk”, as they are not accompanied by any measurable guarantee of their scientific merit. We think the time has come to change all that.

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Open Scholar at the OpenAIRE/COAR Joint Conference: “Open Access Movement to Reality: Putting Together the pieces”

The OpenAIRE (https://www.openaire.eu) / COAR (https://www.coar-repositories.org) Joint Conference “Open Access Movement to Reality: Putting the Pieces Together” took place from the 21st -22nd of May, 2014 at the Acropolis Museum in Athens. The event was attended by about 150 people and was one of a series of events related to open access and linked open data organized by Greece during its 6-month presidency of the EU.

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Open Scholar signs the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment

A new international, multidisciplinary initiative recognizing the need to improve the ways in which the output of scientific research is evaluated.

Open Scholar has signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), joining another 260 (to date) international organisations, who support a series of recommendations towards funding agencies, institutions, publishers, organisations that supply metrics, and researchers, aiming to improve research assessment practices.

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Non-profit organisation ‘Open Scholar C.I.C.’ urges scientists to join their forces against flawed academic publishing model

Media release about Open Scholar and the LIBRE project

“Considering the capability of today’s technology, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to assume that scientists and researchers are able to collaborate and access each other’s work easier than ever before. However, that assumption would be wrong.”

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