Open scientists in the shoes of frustrated academics part I: Open-minded scepticism

By Pandelis Perakakis Originally published in http://blog.euroscientist.com/open-scientists-in-the-shoes-of-frustrated-academics-part-i-open-minded-scepticism/ Last week I was in Oslo, invited by the organising committee of Eurodoc2017, to give an introductory talk on Open Science [1]. One thing that became apparent during this two-day event was that, although irresistibly trendy, Open Science remains an elusive concept. Many continue to confuse Open Science with […]

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Open access repositories start to offer overlay peer review services

Open access repositories administered by Universities or research organizations are a valuable infrastructure that could support the transition to a more collaborative and efficient scholarly evaluation and communication system. Open Scholar has coordinated a consortium of six partners to develop the first Open Peer Review Module (OPRM) for institutional repositories. The module integrates an overlay peer review service, coupled with a transparent reputation system, on top of institutional repositories.

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An open forum to discuss the future of Peer Review

The scientific peer review landscape is finally opening up. The traditional anonymous peer review process is being fiercely challenged by alternative models promoted either by innovative publishers or journal-independent companies. In the light of recent advances, inviting representatives of all emerging initiatives —as well as other independent experts— to an open discussion about peer review […]

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Developing the first Open Peer Review Module for Institutional Repositories

Why aren’t articles on arXiv —or any other open access repository— formally credited as publications? What is it exactly that separates open access repositories from publishers? The simple answer is that publications in journals come with an amorphous quality indicator associated with the journal’s perceived prestige. Articles posted on a repository on the other hand, are considered to be “provided at the reader’s own risk”, as they are not accompanied by any measurable guarantee of their scientific merit. We think the time has come to change all that.

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Academic self-publishing: a not-so-distant-future

After a long delay, our debate article “Academic self-publishing: a not-so-distant future” finally appeared at Prometheus, a journal publishing critical studies in innovation. The journal issue hosting our article was originally expected in September 2013, but a series of unfortunate events resulted in an eight-month standoff between the journal’s editorial team and its publisher Taylor & Francis. In our paper we use an example to illustrate how academic self-publishing can already be implemented with the existing infrastructure.

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Open Scholar at the OpenAIRE/COAR Joint Conference: “Open Access Movement to Reality: Putting Together the pieces”

The OpenAIRE (https://www.openaire.eu) / COAR (https://www.coar-repositories.org) Joint Conference “Open Access Movement to Reality: Putting the Pieces Together” took place from the 21st -22nd of May, 2014 at the Acropolis Museum in Athens. The event was attended by about 150 people and was one of a series of events related to open access and linked open data organized by Greece during its 6-month presidency of the EU.

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